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Does Ubuntu care about the their traditional users

May 14, 2010

I have used Ubuntu as my main desktop at home since 2007 and for the most part I am very happy with it. So when the recent release of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (long term support) came out I left it a couple of weeks for it all the settle down and then did a clean install on my  Dell Latitude D400 which is an old system but servers me perfectly.

The install would not work.  It failed stating there was no such command as Terminal.

I thought maybe I had a bad image so I downloaded again.  Nope – same result.

I then downloaded the latest version of 9.10 and it installed without any problems.

I click the upgrade to 10.04 button and once again at the critical moment it said there was no such command as Terminal.

So, in short Ubuntu 10.04 will not do a clean install on a system that was supported by 9.10 with no cutting edge technology.

I then looked online and saw that the change in GRUB is causing problems for dual boot configuration.  How could this have not been spotted?  Doesn’t anybody in the Ubuntu development team not run a dual boot environment?

Personally, I accept that for the normal released like 9.04 and 9.10 there will be hiccups, but an LTS should be rock solid and this is most definitely not the case with 10.04.  It is designed for long term support but it won’t even install or messes up your current system.

With Canonicals focus on making a profit do they really care about the little guy doing their own install?  Their traditional user base who have been out there evangelizing Ubuntu and helping others to get it going.

Or are they now focused on the OEM and server market where for desktop use Ubuntu will be pre-installed so none of this installation problems will be an issue.

So, the big question is has Canonical and by association Ubuntu moved on?

Are they now so focused on the commercial part of their business that they are not being as rigorous as before?

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